FAX

MAR 2 – JUN 23, 2012

FAX invites a multigenerational group of artists, architects, designers, scientists, filmmakers and writers to reconceive of the fax machine as a thinking and drawing tool. Participants transmit their fax-based work via the venues’ working fax lines through the duration of the exhibition’s tour. Faxes by nearly 100 participants sent to the initial showing of FAX at The Drawing Center form the core of the exhibition, with each institution inviting additional participants to submit works, which will then be archived with The Drawing Center’s collection to create an evolving document of all participants. The accumulation of information-received in real time, in the exhibition space-includes drawings and texts, and the inevitable junk faxes and errors of transmission, creating an ongoing cumulative project.

 

 

Glimpse, a performance by NOW-ID

The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art was honored to present a performance by Salt Lake City’s newest contemporary dance company NOW-ID on September 19th as a significant enrichment to the exhibition Bikuben currently in the Main Gallery.

Exploring the intersection of Utah and Danish heritage, UMOCA’s current major exhibition Bikuben brings together a variety of art forms from some of the most significant Danish artists working today. Drawing from the concepts of identity found in the works, Danish choreographer Charlotte Boye-Christensen captures themes of home, belonging and identity in this one night performance.

“Identity plays a crucial part in my work,” says Boye-Christensen. “I moved away from Copenhagen at a very young age and formed my understanding of myself as an artist through my travels but I am still Danish – this exhibition inspired me to look at what that actually means.”

Glimpse from Now Dance on Vimeo.

Contemporary Reactions: Life in the Future

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A museum, just like any artwork, is experienced in different ways: collective and individual, participative and voyeuristic, and so on. Some like to take a cursory walkthrough of the museum. Others find one work to focus on. Some like to talk about their thoughts, and others can’t quite find the right words.

For a senior at Payson High School, the overall impression of UMOCA was captivating and entrancing. It wasn’t Andy Stevenson’s first visit to the museum, but this trip left the greatest imprint and quickly became his favorite. This time each of the four galleries, though distinct, fit together perfectly to elicit an immersive experience for Andy: a glimpse into a different reality.

“It was like life in the future,” Andy described.

Everywhere, Andy could feel the push-and-pull of cohesion and contrast, especially in the current Street Gallery exhibition, William Lamson’s Hydrologies. In this series, Lamson created generative works by adding and removing water from various landscapes. Set in the harsh environment of the Atacama Desert, Lamson dispersed water across flat gravel to revitalize the desert flora and documented his process using video and photography. In a parallel series, Hydrologies Archaea, Lamson dispersed the saline water of the Great Salt Lake into a variety of small glassware. After the water evaporated, the remnant salt crystals grew within and eventually enveloped the glass, leaving a remarkable and living sculpture installation.

Here, Andy discovered the multiple layers of give-and-take in Lamson’s work. To Andy, the water functions as a powerful symbol. Lamson physically intervenes by giving and taking water to and from each landscape. The works of art that result are stark and beautiful, and resonate as representations of the giving and taking of life.

“[The museum] made me feel like I was in the future!” Andy repeated, smiling. “And it had this elevated sense of society—a society that is more focused on art.” 

Written By Kathy Zhou

William Lamson: Hydrologies will be on display in the UMOCA Street Gallery through January 10, 2015.
 

Contemporary Reactions: The Challenging Cinematography of “Animate V”


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The tap tap of the drum from Simon Dybbroe Møller’s video, Animate V, in our Main Gallery draws people in with its constant boom.

Contemplative visitor, Taryn, was no exception remarking that, “The striking cinematography challenges you to follow it. I love that it was bilingual with two narrators and made you want to explore and watch it again like any good art piece does.”

Animate V is an advertising short of what you can do to a car – move in it, vacation in it, work in it, etc. It invigorates the senses with its quick video segments of heightened sounds, colors and textures. But you can’t simply sit and zone out while watching, it’s too hard, in fact it’s impossible.

There are works that demand to be felt, questioned and methodically thought about and Animate V certainly does so.

Site-specific Installation Art

UMOCA and Artist-In-Residence Tatiana Svrckova Larsen Presents Art Installations and Performances on the Night of Gallery Stroll

SEP 19 | 6-9 PM

In conjunction with UMOCA and under the guidance of UMOCA’s artist-in-residence Tatiana Svrckova Larsen, six local artists will create site specific performance and installation pieces throughout the downtown area of Salt Lake City as the precipice of the five week public art workshop taught by Svrckova Larsen. The work will on view at various public locations open for public during the Salt Lake City Gallery Stroll on September 19th from 6-9 pm. Featuring artists are: Lorina Tester, Justin Chouinard, Alayna Putscher, Mark Putscher, Keri Hop, Marie Duffin and Tatiana Svrckova Larsen.

Map of Locations

Lorina Tester, Bearied
Installation
Lorina’s installation uses a common object “teddy bear” from childhood that so many people put away and then, years later,  wonder where it went.

Justin Chouinard, In Memory of Leroux Ervine Royal
Installation
A eulogy, constructed rather than written or spoken, in memory of a deceased friend, the VHS tape.

Alayna & Mark Putscher, Capture the Moment
Performance (6-9 pm)
A piece showing the life of Sarah a woman taking disappointment and tragedy and turning it around and living her dream. The piece will have a live art demonstration during the event.

Keri Hop, Fragility
Installation
Keri Hop’s piece will explore fragility and resiliency.

Marie Duffin, Acceptance is a Small, Quiet Room
Interactive Installation
Marie Duffin Will be using a quote from writer called “Sugar, The Rumpus” and use it as an inspiration for her site interactive installation piece.

Tatiana Svrckova Larsen, Grip
Performance (6-9 pm)
Svrckova Larsen will execute a site-specific endurance performance where the artist is attached to her surroundings without moving for three hours.

 

Press from Past Projects:
BYU Students Display Art During Downtown Art Walk
Non-Traditional Art in Downtown Provo

 

Your Take on the Art


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Out of State Visit

Last week, UMOCA had the pleasure of welcoming in many out of state guests into the museum from one of Utah’s largest conventions, the Outdoor Retail Summer Market Trade Show, next door at the Salt Palace Convention Center.

One such Californian visitor, Robin, found herself wandering the museum after an OR conference in the auditorium. She was thoughtful in her approach to the art in each gallery, pausing to read and ponder what the work on display was trying to convey.

When approached about what her favorite piece was, Robin told us she enjoyed many things about all five of our exhibits. But In Motion: Borders and Migration seemed to intrigue her the most.  Being from California, the topic is very relevant to her.

“This has been going on for hundreds of years… and there has been a lot of negativity,” said the woman.

One piece that really peaked her interest was Caleb Duarte Piñon’s Dirt Wall.  Piñon’s wall resembling dirt, attempts to fill in the often-invisible conditions of the migration experience by conveying the restrictions of mobility and movement between borders.

Reflecting upon the piece she said, “There is a lot more to tell of the whole story.”

We’re all in this together to learn of the forgotten stories.

Caleb Duarte Piñon’s Dirt Wall, is on view as part of In Motion: Borders and Migration until September 27.

Your Take on the Art

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Family Trip to the Museum

It’s the middle of summer and schoolbooks are nowhere in sight for many kids. In search of a place with air conditioning and lots to learn from, families have been taking trips to the art museum.

We got a visit from a family of five from Lafayette, California this week. The four giddy kids walked through the revolving door, and the father gave them a quick lesson in museum etiquette, followed by instructions on thinking about art and seeing what there is to learn from artwork.

20140718_164538“We’ve got a couple of art lovers and a couple we’re trying to convince,” the dad told me as they went into the gallery.

They spent a good amount of time analyzing the art, and I was lucky enough to hear what their favorites were.

“I liked the golden one,” said the oldest girl. “It looked pretty, and it made me think of raindrops. I liked its shadow too. I also liked the prism one. It kept spinning and spinning and spinning…” she said as she broke into giggles with her little sister.

The oldest son, after some encouragement from his father, also shared his thoughts:

“I liked the gold one too. It was cool how it had to balance. It looked like eyes.”

There’s nothing that warms the heart more than kids learning to love art.

 

Jeppe Hein’s Rotating Mirror Object II and Kirstine Roepstorff’s series of mobiles, Klangmenschen (Sound People), are on view as part of Bikuben until December 20.

Food in the City—E.A.T.!

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Eat Art Together (E.A.T.) is an initiative that combines our two favorite things—art and food—to promote sustainability and community interaction.

In a city it’s easy to forget how interdependent we all are, but E.A.T. gives us an opportunity to see the ways food ties us together. UMOCA has partnered with Wasatch Community Gardens, Neighborhood House, and Real Food Rising to promote awareness of local urban farming and sustainability.

E.A.T. starts with installations by local artist and motorcycle builder Simon Larson and sculptor Robin Clark. Larson’s chicken coop for Wasatch Community Gardens, and Clark’s beehives for Real Food Rising are built from repurposed and recycled materials and have become permanent, functional parts of the gardens.

We’ll finish up the growing season by hosting a bike tour of Salt Lake City’s community gardens, familiarizing participants with each space and the people who farm there.

Join us for a look into sustainable urban farming and the neighborhood around us! For more information visit our calendar here.

Your Take on the Art

 

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Last week the museum was in transition as we built a tower for Bikuben and installed Christopher Kelly GOD COMPLEX. While the Main Gallery and Street Gallery were closed for installation, In Motion: Borders and Migrations continued to capture visitors’ attention.

A couple from Wisconsin couldn’t help but ask as they left, “Does he ever get out of the sand? Does he even have legs?”

They were referring to Caleb Duarte’s haunting video of a man struggling to get out of a hole in the ground on the beach, waves crashing behind him.

“It’s spooky,” the woman said, shaking her head in awe.

Drea, a visitor from Los Angeles, said that where she grew up helps her understand the struggles immigrants have as they start a new life in the United States.

“I liked the film with the guys in the parking lot. I like the irony of the piece, although it is sad,” she said. “This is something that needs to be discussed more.”

In Motion: Borders and Migrations is on view until September 27.

Bikuben is on view until December 20, and GOD COMPLEX until August 16.

From the Front Desk

Your Take on the Art

“It’s refreshing!”

“The message that it has for the country has great significance.”

“This is a good place to ponder.”

All our visitors have different reactions to our art, and from the front desk we get to see the ways you connect with each piece. Since our experiences color the way we perceive art, we want to share some of your stories.

This week I met Kevin Aguilar, a student at LDS Business College who just moved here from Veracruz, Mexico. He shared his thoughts on In Motion: Borders and Migrations.

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“I’ve never been in a museum like this, especially with the Mexican theme. It explains so well the way of life for so many people in Mexico. It’s hard for a lot of people who cross the border. I have some friends that have some of the same situations. One lives in Murray. We call him Jimmy. He was kidnapped in Mexico for three months and had to suffer a lot of things, then had to pay a lot of money to be free. He came to the U.S. and works in construction now.”

In Motion: Borders and Migrations will be on view until September 27.

Postales Desde El Filo

 

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Postcards show places the way you wish they always were—glowing sunsets, pristine landscapes, and shining skylines. In artist Marcos Ramirez ERRE’s postcards, however, the reality of life near Mexican tourist destinations is carefully handwritten on the back, with an honest photo to match.

Postales Desde El Filo, (Postcards From the Edge), is part of In Motion: Borders and Migrations and contains eight postcards from the border city of Tijuana. Images of houses put together with mismatched boards, taco stands devoid of customers, and streets littered with garbage grace cards that show what everyday life is like for people who live there.

“After hearing so many negative things about this city, I realized that there are wonderful things like this and I want to share it with you,” one writer spells out on the back of a card. The front shows a street scene dominated by a billboard advertising beer and a domed building topped with a statue of Christ.

ERRE often comments on socio-economic conditions on the U.S./Mexico border. His work is on view until September 27 as part of In Motion: Borders and Migrations.

Brewing Ideas: do it


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Written by Cerene Shepard

Cafes are breeding grounds for creativity. Your spring semester college assessment most likely started in a cafe, or maybe your summer art gallery submission began over a cup of coffee. How many of us can say that we initiated what would become the largest collection of DIY, instructional works in a local cafe? It was at a Paris cafe in 1993 where curator Hans Ulrich Obrist and co-conspirators Christian Boltanski and Bertrand Lavier started brainstorming what would become the project known as do it.  Obrist shared his interest in an open-ended exhibition format that was flexible enough to transform with each location and depiction. The trio shared historic examples of artist instructions, literary references, and experiences that have accomplished such a feat but a firm inspiration was Jerry Rubin’s 1968 battle cry “Do It!”

As an exhibition began to take shape, the artists communicated the importance of including contributors from differing generations, cultural backgrounds, and disciplines. do it was conceived as a new approach to create art exhibitions that would help defy the rules generally governing the circulation of contemporary art.  The parameters would leave all contributors perfectly equal through the use of instructions. These instructions range from absurd to philosophical, performance to sculptural forms of artistic production. At each location, do it transforms based on its surroundings, becoming less concerned with reproduction or materiality of the artworks. Rather, the exhibition reveals the importance of audience participation and the nuances of interpretation.

With over 50 stops worldwide, do it has become a global experience and dialogue, connecting artists and writers all over the world through interactive processes.  do it: the compendium is the first publication, edited by Obrist and ICI, that brings together a selection of instructions by contributing artists, newly commissioned pieces by contemporary artists, and essays by international writers.

“Kinetic Spaces” Presented by Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company and UMOCA


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August 16th 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm. | Admission is Free

 

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Ririe-Woodbury 50th logo Salt Lake City, UT – Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company and the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) are excited to announce a new installation concept, Kinetic Spaces for one night only August 16th from 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm in celebration of Ririe-Woodbury’s 50th anniversary.

Kinetic Spaces is a durational dance event that co-exists with the artwork currently on exhibit at UMOCA. Wander about and discover vignettes of movement that occur throughout the gallery as the Ririe-Woodbury performers act as dynamic art highlighting the architecture of the space. Experience this living installation as you would any dimensional art piece: with no beginning, middle, or end.

Kinetic Spaces will feature six elegant dancers, a film by video artist Ellen Bromberg and a video installation by Ririe-Woodbury’s Artistic Director Daniel Charon. Complementing those pieces will be an open cash bar, as well as several food trucks including Lewis Bros, Off the Grid, Waki Paki, and Blue Star Juice. Not only shall food and drink entertain the palate and mind but openings for both the new exhibit Creating Absence and UMOCA Art Truck installation for the 2013-2014 school year featuring Calder Kamin will commence. A curatorial walkthrough at 6:00 pm along with the gallery stroll will also be presented during the evening.

The large-scale event is open to public and admission is free. Don’t miss it!

 

About Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company
Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, celebrating its 50th Season as Salt Lake City’s premier contemporary dance organization, is committed to furthering dance as an accessible and valued art form through performing original works by innovative choreographers, touring locally, nationally, and internationally, and providing dance education at all levels. More information is available at www.ririewoodbury.com.

 

About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations. Currently featuring the inaugural ‘Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah,’ a celebration of Utah’s cultural diversity.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011, 2012 and 2013 is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free; $5 donation is appreciated. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

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UMOCA is Pleased to Announce Calder Kamin As the Art Truck Artist for the 2013-2014 Season


Calder Kamin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

For Immediate Release:
August 4, 2013

 

UMOCA is Pleased to Announce Calder Kamin As the Art Truck Artist for the 2013-2014 Season

Opening Reception August 16, 6:00 pm to 9:30 pm
Impact Proof project begins on August 17 at 11:00 am

Salt Lake City, UT – Calder Kamin, an artist and art administrator from Kansas City, MO is set to be Utah Museum Of Contemporary Art’s  new face of the Art Truck for the 2013-2014 academic school year. In conjunction with the Art Truck exhibition, visitors to the UMOCA Art Truck can aide their avian neighbors by participating in Kamin’s project, Impact Proof.

The two part project begins on August 17 at 11:00 am. Participants help prevent birds from colliding into windows by creating paper decals using one of Kamin’s stencil designs. As the second part of the project, Kamin desires for communities to become citizen scientists, encouraging the community to assist scientific research by sharing their observations of nature through crowd sourcing. She is fascinated by the inclusive collaboration growing between technology and conservation. This is apparent, through her participation in the Audubon Christmas Bird Count in January, the Great Back Yard Bird Count online and her ability to identify new species using the iBird app on her iPhone.

Birders at any level can try Kamin’s illustrated survey of Salt Lake City area birds. Data from completed surveys will be sent directly to the Audubon Society with the Utah MOCA Art Truck eBird account. Visual analysis of the survey information will be shared for the duration of the exhibition provided by eBird.

Art Truck E Bird account info:
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User name: Art Truck
Password:  ACOMHATU

“Calder is a perfect fit for the Art Truck. Her practice is based in research and education which results in a hands-on art making activity for kids that teaches them about our relationship to urban wildlife,” said Jared Steffensen, curator of education at UMOCA.

The new Art Truck exhibition will make its debut during the Ririe-Woodbury and UMOCA’s summer party featuring  Kinetic Spaces on August 16th from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

 

About the Art Truck
The UMOCA Art Truck brings exciting and accessible contemporary art, created by leading local and national artists, directly to schools and community venues along the Wasatch Front. Each on-site visit by the Art Truck includes the services of a trained museum educator who leads students through a meaningful exploration of the current exhibition, as well as structured lesson plans for teachers who want to incorporate the Art Truck more deeply into the core curriculum.

The Art Truck is available free-of-charge for a wide variety of educational and charitable purposes.  For more information or to request a visit by the Art Truck, contact Jared Steffensen at jared.steffensen@utahmoca.org or call 801-328-4201 x122.

 

About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Five gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011, 2012, 2013 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

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Into The Mind Of Raivo Puusemp

On July 23rd Krist Gruijthuijsen, director of the Grazer Kunstverein, with artist Raivo Puusemp discussed at length the inspiration and thought processes of Puusemp’s project, Dissolution, currently located in our New Genres Gallery.  It was a relaxing evening with Puusemp’s attire reflecting that feeling- a Hawaiian shirt,  Khaki slacks and sunglasses atop his white hair. Dissolution is a survey of aesthetic structures and systematic process. The artist described to Gruijthuijsen that politics is a social medium. And like any medium, you have to work with it and learn it. Such as with his stint as mayor of a small village in New York and his plan of the dissolution for the town, Puusemp stopped creating art and hasn’t much since stating, “I always thought about art, I just haven’t done it. I would see something, and think someone should do that. But I would never do it myself.”  He was humble about his works made in his earlier years and simple with his answers. It was apparent he wanted people to attempt their artistic ideas just as he had done all those years ago in the 60s and early 70s.

 

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A Revisit of Forgiven By Nature Exhibit Opening

July 5, 2013- artist and architect Gianni Pettena’s heavy Italian accent did not deter him from expressing his love of architecture and nature. Before guests arrived that evening, he walked around the Street Gallery explaining pieces and sculptings to an old friend, and at times pausing to allow a photo to be taken. He even managed in between drinks and walkthroughs to pop outside and smoke a cigar, practice his speech and even perhaps his English. As the art talk began, with big hand gestures and an energetic face, each individual in attendance was drawn to him as he spoke about his works. Sometimes forgetting words in English and instead throwing out Italian ones instead, “Como se dice?” It was no matter, no one minded for he continued on, saying jokes here and there. Occasionally pausing to smoke his electric cigarette as Aaron Moulton asked him questions about Pettena’s view of how ultimately architecture succumbs to mother nature. That time is always present and transformations can happen unconsciously.

For more information on the exhibit visit http://www.utahmoca.org/portfolio/gianni-pettena-forgiven-by-nature/.

 

 

 


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Gianni Pettena: “In The Abscence of Bodies (Laundry)”


Laundry

If any of you happen to be driving by UMOCA on West Temple, make sure to take a gander at some laundry hanging outside our window, literally. The front lawn of UMOCA is dedicated to a recreation of architect and artist, Gianni Pettena’s In the Absence of Bodies (Laundry) 1969/2013.  For two weeks, donated clothing from the community will be hanging and flapping in the hot summer breeze until July 20th.

Take a trip back in time with us; the year was 1969 in the Piazza del Duomo Como, Italy. Pettena chose to hang out laundry on clothes lines, with the aim of underlining the difference between the appearance of a city and the experience of living in it. Thus the installation set out to make people reflect on other aspects of urban space other than merely the visual ones, “violating” its official image by the insertion of a working-class element, similarly different to the landscape. By mocking the static character of that context, the clothes lines draped with laundry hung out to dry, instead spoke to the freshness of life and not the death of its appearance. The washing reminded us that official places are spaces for the display of economic power, but that the city is also, and perhaps above all, a place where life exists.

Today this piece is a communal effort to breathe life of living entities into the city landscape.

UMOCA Presents “Gianni Pettena: Forgiven by Nature”


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Contact: Sarina Ehrgott| sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday-Thursday and Saturday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.

For Immediate Release:
June 28, 2013

 

UMOCA Presents Gianni Pettena: Forgiven by Nature

Opening Reception July 5, 6-9 PM
Admission is Always Free.

 

Salt Lake City, UT ­– The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art is proud to present the first US museum survey of Italian artist and architect Gianni Pettena. Gianni Pettena: Forgiven by Nature is an immersive exhibition of Pettena’s artistic practice and architectural propositions. The span of work presented looks back at his early roots in the Italian Radical Architecture Movement in the late Sixties and early Seventies up to current productions from the past year.

The Radical Architecture Movement ushered in a new wave of imagining the role of the architect and the possibilities of the built environment. Responding to the ever-systematizing structures of Modernist Architecture from architects such as Le Corbusier and others preceding from that period, the Radical Architecture Movement denoted a critique that included utopian and often dystopian possibilities. From the beginning, Gianni Pettena’s practice aimed to better understand how architecture ultimately succumbs to the powers of nature and developed strategies that embraced such forces. In 1972, Pettena was invited by Bob Bliss to teach at the University of Utah. Traveling around Utah, Pettena encountered a landscape that represented the application of philosophies he was developing, and during this time he made his most iconic work: “The Salt Lake Trilogy” – a series that included Clay House, Tumbleweeds Catcher and Siege (A Red Line).

Gianni Pettena: Forgiven by Nature looks at how the artist has established his particular style, which engages with the landscape through tensions between man and nature. Early film, documentation, spatial interventions and archival materials make up the presentation at UMOCA. Pettena has also produced several on-site installations including Human Wall and Human Space as well as a new version of The Absence of Bodies (Laundry) (1969/2013). In the context of the Utah Biennial, a replica of his iconic Tumbleweeds Catcher sits as the centerpiece of the exhibition.

“Pettena is an important figurehead within the history of avant-garde architecture but especially in the context of Utah,” says Senior Curator Aaron Moulton. “As a cultural icon, his legacy is ripe for re-emergence in order to understand how he has physically shaped ideas of landscape. His practice has had an enduring impact internationally among artist and architecture communities and this exhibition is a homecoming to reflect on the work he did here in Salt Lake City as well as underline his importance within a discourse of radical architecture, which he helped pioneer and guide.”

The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art would like to thank Enrico Fornello, Federico Luger, Marco Pace and most importantly Gianni Pettena for their work on this exhibition.

 

About the Artist

Together with Archizoom, Superstudio and UFO, Gianni Pettena belongs to the original nucleus of the Radical Architecture Movement in Italy. Born in 1940, he studied architecture at the University of Florence. In the Sixties, with other students such as Paolo Deganello, Andrea Branzi, Massimo Morozzi and Adolfo Natalini, he helped to create the climate that produced the “Radical” movement, which was the origin of much contemporary experimentation in the field of Italian architecture and design. The impact of his presence in America during the early Seventies was profound. He was a close friend of Robert Smithson and Gordon Matta-Clark. His work was shown at John Weber Gallery amongst his peers of the Land Art Movement. His work was presented in important exhibitions, museums and national and international institutions such as the Venice Biennale, Mori Museum in Tokyo, PAC in Milan, Barbican Center in London, Gamec in Bergamo, Pompidou Centre in Paris and Metz, Berlin Biennale, Italian Pavilion at the 2010 Shangai Expo.

About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011, 2012 and 2013 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

UMOCA Presents Raivo Puusemp: Dissolution


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Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | communications@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org
| 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
June 6, 2013

 

UMOCA Presents Raivo Puusemp: Dissolution

JUN 14­­‑SEP 7
Opening Reception June 14 at 6 PM | Admission Is Free

Salt Lake City – The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) is proud to present Raivo Puusemp: Dissolution, a survey of aesthetic structures and systematic process as a part of the inaugural Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah. The 2013 Biennial consists of artistic statements, collections, artifacts and positions that explore the diversity of Utah’s cultural landscape.

Raivo Puusemp: Dissolution is the first comprehensive overview of Puusemp’s work produced between the mid-1960s and late 1970s. Puusemp is a conceptual artist who is interested in steering people into unwittingly completing his pieces by taking an action the artist had laid out as the next obvious step.  Opening June 14th at 6:00 PM, UMOCA will present an exhibition highlighting the works Puusemp has termed “influence pieces” and the materials documenting his appointment as mayor of Rosendale, New York and his successful maneuver to have the people vote for the dissolution of the village.

In 1975, Raivo Puusemp was elected as Mayor of the troubled town of Rosendale, New York. What the residents did not know, and what his campaign did not reveal, was that Puusemp was a conceptual artist who would later come to view his appointment and the situation as an artwork known as Rosendale, a public work. During his tenure, he applied the work he had been doing as an artist, in group dynamic and predictive behavior, to the political problems of the town and was successful in guiding them to a resolution – the dissolution of Rosendale.

Puusemp documented this process through a series of official letters, documents and press clippings, from which a booklet was later published. Following the dissolution of the town, Puusemp resigned his post, relocating to Utah with his family. He removed himself from the art context and from his practice as an artist.

The exhibition is organized by Krist Gruijthuijsen (NL), director of the Grazer Kunstverein, and has shown at the Grazer Kunstverein (Graz, Austria) and the Project Arts Centre (Dublin, Ireland). The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (Salt Lake City, US) will be the exhibition’s final stop where the last remaining piece created by Puusemp lives as a part of the Salt Lake Art Center collection.

About the Curator
Krist Gruijthuijsen, director of the Grazer Kunstverein, is also the co-founding director of Kunstverein, Amsterdam and course director of the MA Fine Arts program at the Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam.

UMOCA will host a curator talk with Gruijthuijsen in July.

About the Artist
Raivo Puusemp was born in Estonia in 1942 and emigrated at a young age to the U.S. He went on to study at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and moved to New York City after graduating in 1966. At that time, his artistic practice was concerned with the construction of phenomenological sculptural works which gave physical presence to Puusemp’s observations of the natural and social world. In 1969, while involved with an underground art group in New York City, Puusemp developed an interest in group dynamics and social and political processes. Some of his early artistic activity included works he called “influence pieces”. Becoming concerned with the manipulative aspects of this practice, Raivo moved into politics where influence and concept come together compatibly. In 1975 he was elected mayor of a small village and had the opportunity to apply his interest in aesthetic structure and form to the political situation at hand.

Currently, Puusemp is based in Provo.

 

Ravio Puusemp: Dissolution is presented as part of the inaugural Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah. The 2013 Utah Biennial consists of artistic statements, collections, artifacts and positions that explore the diversity of Utah’s cultural landscape.
Zion’s Bank is a proud sponsor of the inaugural Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah.  Special thanks to Zoo, Arts and Parks, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the UMOCA Ambassador’s Circle for their support.

About UMOCA
Award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011, 2012 and 2013, and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

UMOCA Presents Salt Lake Artist David Ruhlman: A History of The Hidden World


rhulman2

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
May 1, 2013

 

UMOCA Presents Salt Lake Artist David Ruhlman: A History of The Hidden World

Show Runs May 10 – August 1
Opening Reception May 10th from 8 to 10 PM
FREE ADMISSION

Salt Lake City – Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) is pleased to present local artist David Ruhlman in his exhibition: A History of the Hidden World.

Fixed between the states of chaos and serenity, David Ruhlman’s mixed media paintings are visual palindromes reflecting the circular nature of beginnings and endings. A History of the Hidden World is an exploration of double entendres, surreal metamorphosis and natural phenomena. These themes relate to apocalypticism and how this mysterious fantasy spawns concepts of beauty and transcendence.

“Ruhlman’s paintings depict strange and charming imagery, revealing wondrous realms of fragmented narratives and untold histories.” Says Assistant Curator Becca Maksym. “Employing allegorical concepts of pandemonium, this body of work presents the world as a rearranged and transformed place where one is continually led through a labyrinth of doppelgängers, anthropomorphic creatures and uncanny fantasies.”

 

David Ruhlman: A History Of The Hidden World is presented as part of the inaugural Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah. The 2013 Utah Biennial consists of artistic statements, collections, artifacts and positions that explore the diversity of Utah’s cultural landscape.
Zion’s Bank is a proud sponsor of the inaugural Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah.  Special thanks to Zoo, Arts and Parks, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the UMOCA Ambassador’s Circle for their support.

About the Artist
Drawing on French playwright Antonin Artaud who used strange and disturbing effects to perplex his audience, Ruhlman’s work depicts peculiar and anthropomorphic motifs that lead viewers through hidden worlds. The artist experiments with form, color and texture, resulting in his own unique visual language. Recurring images of rams, reptiles, birds and fragmented figures tell stories that are not linear, but rather are repetitive trajectories of whimsical fable.

About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011, 2012 and 2013 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests


Warhol film - ST-Marcel Duchamp CAWM

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org
| 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
May 1, 2013

 

Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests on Exhibition at UMOCA

Artist Lecture May 10th at 7 PM

Opening Reception May 10th from 8 to 10 PM
FREE ADMISSION

Salt Lake City, UT ­– Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) is pleased to present The Ready Made Persona: A Selection of Screen Tests by Andy Warhol.

Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests are a seminal moment in the history of portraiture. Warhol asked hundreds of people to take five minutes to sit in front of the camera without giving any specific direction. The result reveals the essence of the person through their unselfconscious boredom, caricatured posturing or grasping attempts at their proverbial 15 minutes of fame. The subjects presented here are specific to illustrating each of those layers with cameos by Marcel Duchamp, innovator of the readymade and whose troublingly playful wit changed art forever; and Jack Smith, a filmmaker whose work honed in on the slippage between directionless states of being with the notion of playing the self. Lastly Allen Midgette, a man who toured the country and played Warhol at the artist’s discretion, until unmasked in Salt Lake City in 1968.

Zion’s Bank is a proud sponsor of the inaugural Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah.  Special thanks to Zoo, Arts and Parks, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the UMOCA Ambassador’s Circle for their support.

About the Artist
Andy Warhol is an American artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as Pop Art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture and advertisement that flourished by the 1960s. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became a renowned and sometimes controversial artist. Warhol’s art encompassed many forms of media, including hand drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, silk screening, sculpture, film, and music.

About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011, 2012 and 2013 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

UMOCA Presents the Inaugural Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah


Tumbleweeds Catcher - lr

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
April 24, 2013

 

 

UMOCA Presents the Inaugural Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah, An Exhibition Exploring the Diversity and Richness of Utah’s Cultural Landscape.

Opening Reception May 10th from 8 to 10 PM with an Artist Lecture at 7 PM

Salt Lake City, UT ­- The inaugural Utah Biennial Mondo Utah offers succinct artistic statements, collections, artifacts and positions that take an anthropological look at the history- past and present-of contemporary art, folklore and culture in Utah. Generating new projects and unearthing archival legacies, the exhibition demonstrates how Utah has produced its own visual language within our country’s cultural puzzle.

“Mondo Utah” or “the world of Utah,” is taken from the eponymous book by Utahn filmmaker Trent Harris, a publication of contemporary mythology that looks into the fables and idiosyncrasies originating from the Beehive state. The word “Mondo” references a filmmaking genre dating back to the early 60s from Italian filmmaker Gualtiero Jacopetti whose 1962 film “Mondo Cane” pioneered a filmmaking style known for cinema verité and pseudo-documentary that blurred reality and fiction. The film was structurally divided into short, unrelated vignettes or stories that brought one through a panorama of events unfolding before the camera.

“This first biennial looks at the myriad of ways in which Utah has been used as a site, subject, support, and material,” says Senior Curator Aaron Moulton. “Mondo Utah celebrates the diversity and richness of Utah’s cultural landscape with a spectrum of voices from all sides of the community. Utah’s cultural lore, forgotten icons and parallel art worlds reimagine the possibilities and relevance of regionalism within an ever-globalizing perspective on contemporary art and cultural production.”

Structured like a Russian doll, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art is taken over by a series of exhibitions within the larger framework of the biennial. The recursive format reveals parallel worlds of art history, recent cultural productions, contemporary practices, outsider trajectories and aesthetic positions. Projects include Andy Warhol’s hoax, Chris Burden’s guerrilla art history, a tower of tumbleweeds, a film bathed in the Dead Sea before being thrown into a Spiral Jetty, a survey of faithful abstraction, the sublime of conceptual landscapes, a contemporary guide to a lost Utah, a 72-hour survival blanket, and an attack of a giant brine shrimp on downtown Salt Lake City.

Biennial participants include:

Ansel Adams, Wulf Barsch, Adam Bateman, Chris Burden, Mike Cassidy, Jared Clark, Maddison Colvin, Stephen Groo, Hagen Haltern, Michael Handley, Trent Harris, Nancy Holt, Levi Jackson, Annie Kennedy, Cara Krebs, David Chapman Lindsay, Paul McCarthy, Jon McNaughton, Jim Mangan, Jason Metcalf, Allen Midgette, Bob Moss, Diane Orr, Gianni Pettena, Annie Poon, J. Kirk Richards, Jean Richardson, C. Larry Roberts, Derek Rigby, Casey Jex Smith, Jared Steffensen, Summum, UltimusMormon, Morganne Wakefield, Jennifer West, Andrea Bowers & Corey Redstone, Matthew Antezzo & Seher Shah, et al.

Biennial Agenda and Collateral Programming include the following exhibitions:

  • “The Readymade Persona – a selection of Screen Tests from Andy Warhol of Marcel Duchamp, Jack Smith and Allen Midgette.” Opening in New Genres Gallery on May 10th.
  • “David Ruhlman: A History of the Hidden World.” Opening in Local’s Only Gallery on May 10th.
  • “Faithful Abstraction”, a collaboration with CUAC curated by Adam Bateman. Opening within Mondo Utah on May 10th.
  • A selection of religious artworks from the LDS Church History Museum and commissioned Cristo paintings a la Francis Alÿs by J. Kirk Richards curated by Laura Allred Hurtado. Opening within Mondo Utah on May 10th.
  • “A Sublime of Conceptual Landscapes – A selection of works from the Salt Lake Art Center Collection.” Opening within Mondo Utah on May 10th.
  • “Raivo Puusemp: Dissolution” curated by Krist Gruijthuijsen. Opening in New Genres Gallery on June 14th.
  • “Gianni Pettena: Forgiven by Nature.” Opening in Street Gallery on July 5th.

Institutional collaborations and collections come from the Church History Museum, CUAC, Summum, the Special Collections Department at the J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah, Electronic Arts Intermix, Wolf Productions, the Andy Warhol Museum, and the Salt Lake Art Center Collection.

 The opening of Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah will be on May 10th, 8-10 p.m. accompanied by an artist lecture, live music, food and cash bar.

Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah and related programming is made possible in part through the generous support of Zoo, Arts and Parks, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the UMOCA Ambassador’s Circle.

About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011, 2012 and 2013 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

Embroidery and Etiquette Club at UMOCA


EtiquetteClub

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | Sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
April 4, 2013

 

“Sewing” the Seeds of Good Manners
Embroidery and Etiquette Club at UMOCA

Salt Lake City - Currently on exhibition at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) is Neutralize Negative Feelings, an installation by the Serbian-born, Los Angeles-based artist Ana Prvacki (pronounced Pri-vatch-key). Her work engages primarily with the rituals of social etiquette and hospitality as raw material. Having substantiated her somewhat pigeon-holed interests over a decade ago by launching the mail-order company Ananatural Productions, Prvacki’s aim was to produce items and services ranging from the practical to the absurd that offer unconventional solutions to the often unspoken social anxieties in daily life. This focus has now settled into the Embroidery and Etiquette Club where members are invited free of charge to wax lyrical about their favorite circumstantial stumbles while creating embroideries in the style of Prvacki’s exhibition.

The Embroidery and Etiquette Club merges together the language of Martha Stewart with that of Marina Abromovic enabling Prvacki to instruct on empathy and advocate for a more transparent commonplace. Transforming the stress and awkwardness of societal life, Prvacki empowers club members with the tools necessary to recover from embarrassing situations with grace. The club is hosted by UMOCA every Friday night from 6-8 PM until the close of her exhibition show on April 27, 2013.

Prvacki’s own personal life has been an integral part of her work and this project. Since moving from Serbia to Singapore at the age of 13 then traveling back and forth to and from Los Angeles, she describes learning how to behave in a way that does not alienate oneself and others as a lifelong practice.

Prvacki’s own diverse experience and expertise on the subject of social interaction along with her work’s utilitarian approach encourages participants to neutralize their own negative feelings about perceived notions of tradition in needlework, femininity, and etiquette. The club helps participants explore varying social codes and cultural structures using a light-hearted and humorous tone, balancing-out contrived expectations or antagonistic sentiments with acts of congeniality and restraint.

The Embroidery and Etiquette Club provides a subversive platform for negotiating relationships and assigned meaning that typically are avoided, such as navigating personal space, and what to do about spinach stuck in your teeth. The tote bags themselves are embroidered with relaxed yet politically loaded phrases and often depict bees, which work to embody the practice of etiquette and the equanimity it requires.

The public is invited to join in the gossip while embroidering Utah icons on totes that will become a traveling aspect of Prvacki’s future exhibitions.
April 5 – Table Manners
April 12 – Travelling at Home and Abroad
April 19 – American Neighborhood Customs and Growth of Good Taste in America

Unaltered totes are also available for purchase for $30.

The Embroidery and Etiquette Club is a combined effort between the artist, UMOCA and LAXART, the Los Angeles-based curatorial initiative.

About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011 and 2012 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

UMOCA Presents Ignacio Uriarte: Binaries


Arbeitsraum

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | Sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201|
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
February 27, 2013

 

 

UMOCA Presents Ignacio Uriarte: Binaries

MAR 1 – JUN 15

Salt Lake CityUtah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) is proud to present Ignacio Uriarte: Binaries, a survey about the work place as a total medium.

Join UMOCA for an opening reception for Ignacio Uriarte on March 1st from 8-10 p.m. and a Q&A with the artist hosted by Senior Curator Aaron Moulton beginning at 7 p.m. Claimed to be one of the top 10 artists to watch in 2013 by The Huffington Post, this is an evening not to be missed.

Spanish-born, Berlin-based artist Ignacio Uriarte obtained a degree in business administration and, naturally, pursued a career in an office environment. Throughout the day, Uriarte found himself intersecting the behaviors, textures, and languages of organizational culture with the strategies and tactics of Minimalism and Conceptual art. This unconventional path led him to a bilingual artistic practice that can be understood by anyone who has either stood in an art museum or occupied a cubicle.

UMOCA’s presentation of Binaries is an immersive survey into Uriarte’s research on the formal subjects of black and white, convex and concave, handmade and mass-produced as well as fundamental issues found in routine office environments. The works and the title are a reflection on the artist’s intersection of these two practices.

Uriarte describes his own practice as a “typology of the error,” a call-and-answer between man and technology and the constant battle to accomplish an objective perfectly despite inevitable impossibility. Overall, his work is defined by a relationship to familiar rituals, set standards and unconscious actions that are built into how we navigate daily life. The parameters for any given project are predetermined by the chosen medium’s limitations and Uriarte is merely the messenger exposing the available results.

“Uriarte’s work is problematically accessible: Everyone can see themselves, their rituals and their actions in these ironically neutral plays on minimalism,” says Senior Curator Aaron Moulton. “Suddenly procrastination, down time, looking busy, and daydreaming become viable methodologies for exploring conceptual mandalas and aesthetic situations.”

UMOCA’s programming including Ignacio Uriarte: Binaries is made possible in part through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. A special thanks to the following for their kind collaboration:

Acción Cultural Española (AC/E) in Madrid
Galeria Nogueras Blanchard, Barcelona / Madrid
Navigator Paper

About The Artist

Ignacio Uriarte has had solo exhibitions at Sala Rekalde in Bilbao, Spain in 2011 and recently at the Drawing Center in New York. The Huffington Post claimed him to be one of the top 10 artists to watch in 2013. Ignacio Uriarte is represented by Galeria Nogueras Blanchard, Barcelona / Madrid; i8 Gallery, Reykjavik; Galleria Gentili, Prato; and La Fábrica, Madrid.

 About UMOCA
Award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011 and 2012 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

UMOCA Presents Ana Prvacki: Neutralize Negative Feelings


Prvacki-Ettiquette_6_Still02

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
February 27, 2013

 

UMOCA Presents Ana Prvacki: Neutralize Negative Feelings

MAR 1 – APR 27

Salt Lake City - The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) is proud to present Ana Prvacki: Neutralize Negative Feelings, an installation about etiquette.

Join UMOCA for an opening reception of Ana Prvacki: Neutralize Negative Feelings March 1st from 8 to 10 p.m., Prvacki will be present to talk about her work.

Using social codes and cultural structures as a raw material, Serbian-born, Los Angeles-based artist Ana Prvacki (pronounced Pri-vatch-key) turns the rituals of hospitality into a theater of performance. Until 2010 the artist was CEO of the brand Ananatural Productions, a conceptual factory of ideas ranging from the practical to the absurd, creating products which offered shortcuts to better living and designs for needs we never knew we had. Merging Martha Stewart with Marina Abramovic, the language of Prvacki’s work seems as familiar as IKEA or Emily Post but awkwardly turned on its head.

For the recent edition of Germany’s renowned contemporary art survey dOCUMENTA13, Prvacki was commissioned to create a series of Public Service Announcements (PSAs) that were cleverly dispersed in locations throughout the city and on German television. The television spots helped citizens and tourists navigate difficult social circumstances like personal space, spinach in one’s teeth or accidentally spitting while speaking. These scenarios were played out on camera and then corrected by the artist, etiquette counselor Vartouhi Keshishyan and comedy group The Intecollectuals. The result is a strong mix of humor and instructional empathy empowering viewers with tools to recover their possible embarrassments with grace.

In her exhibition Neutralize Negative Feelings at UMOCA, Prvacki morphs her PSA work into a new artistic direction, historicizing the codes of imposed etiquette with the motivational sloganeering of past generations. Embroidered adages like “Happy Wife, Happy Life” are given new and more relevant meaning by updating it with current, universal situations of human folly and faux pas.

Prvacki’s installation is comprised of ceramic hearth plates, napkins with embroidered spinach spots, and the complete cycle of her PSA series. The public is invited to engage in dialogue about social codes, gossip, sewing circles and days of old in the founding of our new “Embroidery and Etiquette Club.”

Meeting every Friday in the gallery space from 6 to 8 p.m. for the duration of the exhibition, the club members are free to wax lyrical about their favorite circumstantial stumbles while creating embroideries in the style of Prvacki’s exhibition. The Embroidery and Etiquette Club is a combined effort between the artist, UMOCA and LAXART, the Los Angeles-based curatorial initiative, to create a new series of artist-designed totes which will be available for sale.

“Ana Prvacki is a savvy chameleon whose artistic practice is often invisibly presented and consumed,” says Senior Curator Aaron Moulton. “Taking both the attitudes of feminism and the culture that created them, her work causes us to reflect on the rules and tools for engagement in today’s society. “Neutralize Negative Feelings” itself becomes a mantra for the theater of customer service culture and the hegemony of hospitality.”

UMOCA’s programing including Ana Prvacki: Neutralize Negative Feelings is made possible in part through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. A special thanks to LAXART and Lombard Freid for their kind collaboration.

About The Artist
Ana Prvacki (b. 1976, Serbia) is an artist whose work draws on daily practices and social research. Her interventions into daily life are meant to transform the viewer’s perception and experience of daily life and routine, attempting to provide solutions to our daily problems, worries, and fears. She explores social anxiety and the comedic potential of faux pas.

Her art work has been exhibited internationally and was included in the 2006 Singapore Biennial and Turin Triennial, 2008 Sydney Biennial and dOCUMENTA 13. She has developed projects at various art institutions, including Bloomberg (NY), Art in General (NY), Artists Space (NY), Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (Boston), Centre Pompidou (Paris), Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea (Turin), and Hammer Museum (Los Angeles). She is represented by Lombard Freid Gallery where she will have a solo exhibition this fall.

 About UMOCA
Award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provid e an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011 and 2012 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

Looking Forward to Spring Events!


UMOCA-Press02

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | Sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
February 19, 2013

 

Looking Forward to Spring! UMOCA’s Schedule of Events Through May.

Analogital

Analogital is an exhibition of international artists who engage with concepts generated from the transitional space between analogue and digital forms. This exhibition identifies a perceptual evolution in the human experience that emerges from our culture’s conversion of film grain to computer pixel.

Exhibit runs now thru APR 20

 

Venessa Gromek:
The Sublime is Light and Easy-To-Assemble

Stemming from her passion for the outdoor industry and her interest in how that industry intersects with notions of the sublime, artist Venessa Gromek creates tent-like sculptures that engage with concepts of abstract artwork, euphoric experience, and impossible functionality.

Exhibit runs now thru APR 27

 

Ignacio Uriarte: Binaries

Spanish-born, Berlin-based artist Ignacio Uriarte came to art unconventionally through business administration and pursuing a life in the office. UMOCA is proud to present  Binaries, an immersive survey into the labor-intensive research of the office as a total medium.

Opening Reception MAR 1, 8-10PM
Artist Q&A MAR 1, 7-8PM
Gallery Walkthrough with the artist 9PM

 

Ana Prvacki: Neutralize Negative Feelings

Using social codes and cultural structures as a raw material, Serbian-born, Los Angeles-based artist Ana Prvacki  turns the rituals of hospitality into a theater of performance by historicizing codes of imposed etiquette with the motivational sloganeering of past generations.

Opening Reception MAR 1, 8-10PM
Gallery Walkthrough with the artist 9PM

Utah Biennial of Contemporary Art
Mondo Utah

UMOCA’s inaugural biennial, Mondo Utah, will look backward into the evolution of contemporary art within Utah to create a formal index of the state’s cultural landscape. The first of UMOCA’s new biennial exhibitions will examine ways in which artists have used Utah as a site, subject, purpose, meaning and material.

Opening Reception MAY 17, 8-10PM
Runs MAY 17 – SEP 21

 

Seven Pianos From “Play Me, I’m Yours 2012″ Donated to Legacy Music Alliance


PMIY 005
Seven pianos from the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art’s Play Me, I’m Yours 2012 summer project in Salt Lake City will be donated to Legacy Music Alliance; Pianos will be given to schools across Utah as part of LMA’s music education mission  

Salt Lake City, Utah (Jan. 25, 2013) Seven pianos that were part of the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art’s 2012 summer sensation called Play Me, I’m Yours in downtown Salt Lake City will be donated to Legacy Music Alliance for eventual adoption into school programs around the state.

Chrissy Upton, development coordinator for UMOCA, the presenter and organizer of Play Me, I’m Yours, said in announcing the donation “we are so pleased that these pianos will continue to be a symbol of creativity, visual artistry and musical expression for children throughout the state. When we learned of LMA’s mission to improve music education in Utah public schools, we agreed that this would be an ideal partnership.”

Gaylen Rust, president and founder of Legacy Music Alliance, said the pianos will be tuned and refurbished so they are in good working order before being distributed to schools.  “We are delighted to receive the Play Me, I’m Yours pianos and give them a new life. These pianos are more than just instruments. They represent the good that happens when a community works together to bring the arts into our everyday lives. We look forward to placing them in schools that need them.” All of the Play Me, I’m Yours pianos were individually painted by local artists as part of the community initiative and Rust pledged to keep the artwork intact.  The artists included Paul Heath, Ben Wiemeyer, Trent Call, Carey Ann Francis, Constant Dullaart and Sri Whipple/Jason Jones.  One of the pianos was painted during UMOCA’s Family Art Saturday.

For two weeks during June, 2012, 10 pianos in the Play Me, I’m Yours exhibition were placed in locations around Salt Lake City with the invitation for anyone – musicians, rank amateurs, and the musically untrained of every age – to play them. The pianos and the presentation were made possible through the generosity of several donors and sponsors including Daynes Music, Nordstrom, Bert and Lynnie Zimmerli, the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Arts , Salt Lake City Signature Event Fund, Downtown Alliance, Jarvis & Constance Doctorow Family Foundation, Mundi Project, Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts & Parks, Utah Arts Council, Salt Lake City Arts Council, City Weekly, and helpful piano minders at Jones Waldo, Celtic Bank, Squatters Pub Brewery, and the United States General Services Administration.

Among the artists who performed on the sidewalk pianos were Utah pianist Paul Cardall.  students from Salt Lake City’s piano education program – the Mundi Project – including 12-year-old Sarah Shipp performing Mendelssohn’s Piano Concerto in G Minor, and the 5 Browns.

Utah leads the nation, per capita, in piano ownership. Play Me, I’m Yours was the brainchild of a British musician Luke Jerram, who introduced the concept in the UK in 2008. Since then, Play Me, I’m Yours has reached an estimated five million people worldwide. Salt Lake City now joins hundreds of cities across the globe, from New York to Sydney, who have participated in the initiative.  It has toured internationally with more than 600 pianos.

About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011 and 2012 and is a four-time  recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org

 About Legacy Music Alliance

Legacy Music Alliance was organized in 2010 as a non-profit association to bolster music education in the Intermountain West and increase Utah’s stature as a prominent national music education and resource center. Program resources will be focused on every aspiring artist who wishes to develop their craft as well as music educators and music professionals in the region. The mission of the Alliance is comprehensive in scope providing everything from master classes, private lessons, and business skills to professional collaboration, and monetary support.  The Alliance will address urgent needs identified by music educators in the public classroom as well as assist talented artists with national ambitions. The Legacy Music Alliance is headed by CEO Gaylen Rust, a successful Utah businessman, and Dr. Craig Jessop, Chairman of the Executive Advisory Board and currently Dean of the Caine College of the Arts at Utah State University. Dr. Jessop was the former Director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. LMA is an education-based 501(c)(3) non-profit charity. For more information go to http://www.legacymusicalliance.org/

UMOCA Presents Analogital


SFAS analogital

Contact: Sarina Ehrgott | Sarina.ehrgott@utahmoca.org | 801.328.4201
www.utahmoca.org | 20 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Tuesday – Thursday and Saturday 11 AM – 6 PM | Friday 11 AM – 9 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Jan. 10, 2013

 

 

UMOCA Presents Analogital
JAN 18 – APR 20, 2013

Salt Lake City - Analogital is an exhibition of international artists who engage with concepts generated from the transitional space between analogue and digital. Specifically the notion analyzes the forms that emerge from our culture’s conversion from film grain to computer pixel. However, more broadly the term identifies a perceptual evolution in the human experience and its mediation.

In the mid-seventies at the University of Utah, innovators made breakthrough developments in early computer graphics and virtual designs like the “Utah Teapot”, experiments that would lead to the founding of Pixar and early pursuits of digital reality. Eventual media such as ASCII, ProTools, Nintendo Entertainment System, CAD, gifs, jpegs and above all the Internet opened a multiverse of possible ways to render, perceive and copy the world around us. Social networking interfaces, video game systems and reality television additionally provide new avenues through which communication, behavioral learning and interaction occur virtually or with mediated remove. Analogital is about artists analyzing this science-fictional relationship existing between technology and the human condition.

“Today’s voracious image culture has led to a simulacrum of compounds where artists reference references of references and imagine the copy to be the original,” says Senior Curator Aaron Moulton. “New image vocabularies are emerging coupled with an unnostalgic condition where these images appear, quickly evolve, disperse and disappear unarchived. Yet certain likenesses pervade our consciousness with no traceable reference, a kind of collective consciousness in an open-sourced handmade pixel. This combined with the virtual social conditions allow for a new way of considering sentimentality, sentience and sociality in the 21st century.”

The opening of Analogital will be on January 18, 8-10 p.m. with DJ/DC, food and cash bar. There will also be a Q&A prior to the reception with artist Jennifer West 7-8 p.m.

Artists: Cory Arcangel, Juliette Bonneviot, Spartacus Chetwynd, Vuk Cosic, Chris Coy, Harm van den Dorpel, Constant Dullaart, Lauren Elder, Daniel Everett, Mark Flood, Christian Jankowski, Oliver Laric, Mark Leckey, Joep van Liefland, Eva and Franco Mattes, Ciprian Muresan, Rob Pruitt, Borna Sammak, John Sparagana, Ignacio Uriarte, Utah Teapot, Jennifer West, Jordan Wolfson

Analogital and related programming is made possible in part through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

 About UMOCA
The award-winning Utah Museum of Contemporary Art exhibits groundbreaking artwork by local, national, and international artists. Four gallery spaces provide an opportunity for the community to explore the contemporary cultural landscape through UMOCA’s exhibitions, films, events, classes, and presentations.

Founded in 1931, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been recognized as Best Museum in the State of Utah for 2011 and 2012 and is a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Located at 20 S. West Temple; open Tuesday-Thursday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Saturday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.utahmoca.org.

Copyright 2014/15 Utah Museum of Contemporary Art | 20 S West Temple | Salt Lake City, UT 84101 | 801.328.4201